CANCELLED: Yelawolf: Trial By Fire Tour

Event Cancelled: Due to unforeseen circumstances, the remaining dates on the Trial By Fire tour have been canceled and will be rescheduled at a later date. Refunds provided at point of purchase.

CANCELLED: Yelawolf: Trial By Fire Tour

Bubba Sparxxx, Jelly Roll, Struggle Jennings

Wed, November 30, 2016

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$25.00

Cancelled

This event is all ages

Due to unforeseen circumstances, the remaining dates on the Trial By Fire tour have been canceled and will be rescheduled at a later date. Refunds provided at point of purchase.  

Keep an eye on Yelawolf.com and Slumerican .com for further announcements.

Yelawolf
Yelawolf
The very day Yelawolf was born, his teenage mother strapped him into a stroller and rolled him around the mall. The first week of his life, she took him to house parties, and by the time he left high school, the family had roamed to so many towns that Yelawolf had attended 15 different schools.

“I really never ever stopped moving,” he says while driving around Nashville, his home of the past three years. “That’s my life story in a nutshell.”

With his latest release, Love Story, perhaps he can finally downshift. Since 2010’s Trunk Muzik, his career has been on the fast track. His appearance—his tattoos include a catfish swimming down his forearm and “Heart of Dixie” stamped on his stomach—and raps about Appalachian meth dealers might’ve made him a novelty act. But his rapid-fire delivery and intense live show ensured no one considered him a joke. As Pitchfork marveled, “Yelawolf is a powerful new rap voice, one that draws from all over the map without sounding much like anyone else.” Interscope Records agreed and within three months, he had a major label deal. Later that year, the tape was re-released as Trunk Muzik 0-60, and Rolling Stone praised him as “an MC whose liquid flow breathes life into genre clichés.” In January 2011, he signed to Eminem’s Shady Records, and his fan base grew even more rabid. Yet Wolf wasn’t satisfied.

“The mullet and Three 6 Mafia. How do you make that work?” he says. “What I’ve always been trying to do is figure out how to make that into a good mixture of music.”

Yelawolf was born Michael Wayne Atha in Gadsden, Alabama, where his two musical loves grew organically. His mom dated a sound engineer, and Wolf remembers being onstage at age six with Dwight Yoakam, and Run DMC coming by his house to party after their local show when he was seven. “I woke up in this trailer park and figured out what was ironic about who I was and where I was from wasn’t that what I was experiencing was new. It was just that I recognized the extreme of it,” he says.

After being homeless in Berkeley and working on a ship off the coast of Washington state, Yelawolf landed back in the South and started making mixtapes. He was purposefully rowdy, wearing head-to-toe deer hunting camouflage and gold teeth. In Atlanta, Wolf and his friend Malay (the producer who later won a Grammy for Frank Ocean’s Channel Orange) started a “futuristic country hip-hop rock band” that included both a DJ and a black fiddle player. Their self-described “arena rap” became popular in Atlanta, pulling huge crowds as well as the attention of Lil Wayne and L.A. Reid. But their idea was ahead of its time and fizzled.

Wolf was poor, and his now ex-girlfriend and their child were still living in Gadsden. Running out of options, he returned to Alabama with producer WLPWR. “We got an 8-track recorder in the back of this shitty house in this factory neighborhood worthy of any Harmony Korine film, and we wrote Trunk Muzik front to back,” he says. He hustled back to Atlanta to record it, and the tape that set his career ablaze and resulted in his working with legends like Bun B and Big Boi was completed in all of a week and a half.

“I became that shit. I saw the power in it. [And] I felt fulfilled,” he admits. “But I always knew, ‘Wait ‘till they hear the shit I did with Malay.’”

At long last, they’re listening, and the response is as positive as he always believed it would be. Recorded entirely in Nashville’s Blackbird Studios and executively produced by Eminem, his passion project—fittingly titled Love Story—is a rootsy, country-tinged rock album brimming with strong lyricism. Finally, he’s struck the right balance.

“I’m not reinventing the wheel. It’s nothing Kid Rock hasn’t done,” he says. “But what is new is my deep appreciation for lyricism in hip hop, [my desire] to be a great lyricist. And a deep appreciation for outlaw country, for raw classic rock. I started to learn how to blend concepts together.”

Indeed he did. The album’s first single, “Till It’s Gone,” is a driving barn burner of a song elevated by Wolf’s melodically sung hook. Radio friendly without sacrificing its soul, it’s an undeniable smash that’s in line with the country’s recent obsession with the culture of rural American life. In fact, “Till It’s Gone” premiered last September on the wildly popular FX drama Sons of Anarchy.

“It might be simple, but when I decided to put down sneakers and throw on some boots … it feels like I've come full circle ... riding Harleys with my Dad ... it all makes sense, ” he says. A smile enters his voice. “It’s the biggest exhale.”

YelaWolf's new album Love Story is in stores NOW!
Bubba Sparxxx
Bubba Sparxxx
It seems like Country Rap is starting to take over mainstream. With the recent success of Colt Ford and The Lacs along with current “rap style” hits by country mega stars Jason Aldean (Dirt Road Anthem), Toby Keith (Red Solo Cup) and Tim McGraw (Truck Yeah), one would think that this is a new concept. But if you are a true hip-hop historian you would recall that this movement actual began in 2001 with the release of Bubba Sparxxx’s debut album “Dark Days, Bright Nights”. The video for the first single “Ugly” featured Bubba and pals in the mud with pigs, on tractors and performing in front of a house covered with bug lights. If that’s not the epitome of Country, then nothing is.

The platinum certified “Dark Days, Bright Nights” debuted on Interscope Records in October 2001 and was produced by Houchins and superstar producers Timbaland and Organized Noize. It was follow-up by the critically acclaimed 2003 release “Deliverance”.

“I remember thinking, as a 12 or 13 year old kid, that the spirit of hip-music wasn't a whole lot different than the spirit of "outlaw" country music I had grown up hearing around my pops and uncles.” Bubba recalls. “The rebellious nature of say NWA, or 2 Live Crew, or The Geto Boys, in the late 80s, early 90s just wasn't that different from the movement that guys like Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Billy Joe Shaver and others created by simply being themselves and saying what they wanted. Not to mention things were changing in rural areas, during my teenage years. The various drug epidemics had penetrated my neck of the woods, and the "reality" of life in the country had begun to shift. Folks were still hard working, and had traditional values, but drugs, and violence had become more prevalent, as a new generation of boys and girls, became man and women, in this environment. In some ways, the lower class, even out there where we were, started to identify as much with rap music, as country. This coincided with hip-hop, and rap exploding on popular culture, so the merging of the two genres, in terms of people.

“With the first album "Dark Days Bright Nights" we knew the people we wanted to reach, but didn't necessarily know how to reach them. This would really be the case with “Deliverance”, a couple years later. We had hooked up with Organized Noize, and Timbaland, two of the most accomplished, and respected names in urban music, and they had really bought in to what we were trying to do. This was an exciting time! We were very successful with the first album, taking baby steps toward bringing the two worlds together. The lyrics, and imagery were definitely country but the music was still pretty urban leaning. In retrospect, that's probably right where we needed to be at that time. As we prepared to record the 2nd album, "Deliverance", it was actually Timbaland, who decided the music needed to match the lyrics and imagery. “

“As bold as "Deliverance" was, it was probably too big of a leap forward to win commercially when it was released in 2003. We were still marketing, and promoting the "old way" and spending tons of money at radio and trying to get MTV and BET to play the video. It was also at a time when Lil John had the whole world "crunk."

Looking back, it's actually pretty remarkable that the song and album "Deliverance"did as well as they did. We just didn't know how to reach the people we wererepresenting. Keep in mind there was no YouTube, and the Internet was still an infant in terms of the impact it would soon have on music. Interscope Records did the best they could, based on the way they did things at the time, but in the end we all failed miserably in thinking of ways to market an album so outside of the box.

I will slap anybody who questions my right to sit at this table, and eat. We fought wars for this, and it wasn't always this easy.
New South.”
Jelly Roll
Jelly Roll
Checking in at six feet one inches and over 350 pounds, not to mention covered in tattoos, it’s impossible to ignore Jason “Jelly Roll” DeFord in a room. And that’s before his booming country-twanged voice enters the conversation. “I’m just a regular fat piece of white trash with some real people that relate,” he loudly explains with a wide grin, sending everyone else within earshot into riotous laughter. For the 27-year-old Jelly, a nickname he picked up from his mother and kept to honor an incarcerated friend, humor has always been a way to cope with the struggle he would go through in life. Growing up in the rougher areas of Nashville, TN, particularly the Southside city known as Antioch, Jelly got an early taste for street life and fast cash. “I’ve always joked that Antioch is the cultural melting pot the government uses to test how different ethnicities live together in a lower and middle class area,” He laughs referring to the city’s racially diverse, albeit economically bleak make up.Captivated by the gritty rhymes of local legends such as Pistol, Quanie Cash, Haystak, and Kool Daddy Fresh, it wasn’t long before the music would mirror Jelly Roll’s personal life. Catching his first case at age 14, Jelly would endure an ongoing cycle of incarceration until 2009 which would include intent to distribute cocaine charges and multiple probation violations.Continuing to soak up the sounds from southern artists such as UGK, 8ball & MJG, Three 6 Mafia, Chamillionare and Paul Wall, it was during these particularly dark times that Jelly would turn to crafting his own rhymes as a therapeutic means to deal with his trials and tribulations: “My music is all based on emotions and stories from my life as well as people around me. I want to convey to people the power of faith and perseverance and I hope that it helps them to find a light in whatever darkness they may be going through in there life.” In the summer of 2010, Jelly Roll’s “Pop Another Pill” collaboration with Memphis luminary Lil Wyte would go on to garner over 1 million YouTube views. This viral sensation lead to the SNO group album Year-Round released on Hypnotized Minds in April 2011, a project executive-produced by Oscar winners DJ Paul and Juicy J. Jelly continued his successful 2011 campaign by releasing Gambling On A Whiteboy 4 during the summer and combining his talents with Haystak for the successful Strictly Business joint-album in November. His unique combination of introspection, melody, and punchlines has struck a chord with an ever-growing nationwide fan base and continues to impress. In between new projects, Jelly still finds time to volunteer at and provide financial backing for the local SuCO Boxing & MMA gym to help provide disadvantaged youth with a place to take part in positive activities. “My ultimate goal is to touch and reach people and have a voice of influence with the youth of today, he reveals. “I know that sounds like the opposite of what I’m aiming for by the content of some of my bigger songs, but the real purpose will shine through in the end. Helping people and life in general is a marathon, not a 40-yard-dash.” Spoken like someone who has truly been through the fire, its evident Jelly Roll is on a path to even greater acclaim- and that means a greater change for the world.
Struggle Jennings
Struggle Jennings
Struggle was destined to be an Outlaw.. The grandson of legendary Country Music icon Waylon Jennings, Struggle is part of a long legacy of Gangsters, Outlaws and Rock Stars.. Growing up as a black-sheep in his family, he was forced to fight his way out of the streets of West Nashville, eventually making his way into the studio to laying the foundation for what would soon become his personal contribution to the Jennings family legacy.. But his past finally caught up with him in the fall of 2011 when he was arrested on State and Federal drug conspiracy charges.

Having been incarcerated for the last 2 years, Struggle has gone through a complete transformation.. Mentally, emotionally and physically.. Through sharing his story on social media networks, Struggle has grown emotionally and intellectually, assuming a new level of social responsibility and becoming an inspirational and motivating force in the lives of people all around the world. He has maintained the ability to oversee his career and his public persona through his constant communication with his management team. Struggle's message of strength, determination and courage in the face of adversity has been amplified by his daily presence on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. With the support of Yelawolf, his Slumerican family, as well as his business partner Sebastian Marbury, Struggle has managed to develop and maintain a direct connection with his fans despite his being incarcerated.
Venue Information:
The Bomb Factory
2713 Canton Street
Dallas, TX, 75226
http://thebombfactory.com