A Day to Remember: 15 Years in the Making

A Day to Remember: 15 Years in the Making

Papa Roach, Falling In Reverse, The Devil Wears Prada

Wed, March 7, 2018

Doors: 6:00 pm / Show: 6:30 pm

$44.99 - $150.00

This event is all ages

A Day To Remember
A Day To Remember
Over the course of the past several years, each of A Day To Remember’s releases have hit No. 1 on Billboard’s Rock, Indie and/or Alternative Charts. They’ve also sold more than a million units, racked up over 400 million Spotify streams and 500 million YouTube views, garnered two gold-selling albums and singles (and one silver album in the UK) and sold out entire continental tours (including their own curated Self Help Festival), amassing a global fanbase whose members number in the millions. All of which explains why Rolling Stone called them “An Artist You Need To Know.” In other words, their creative process has worked and worked well.

But for new album Bad Vibrations, the Ocala, Florida-based quintet of vocalist Jeremy McKinnon, guitarists Kevin Skaff and Neil Westfall, bassist Joshua Woodard and drummer Alex Shelnutt switched gears and headed for uncharted territory. Their path included a loose and much more collaborative songwriting process, one that also saw them recording for the first time with producers Bill Stevenson (Descendents, Black Flag) and Jason Livermore (Rise Against, NOFX). And though the album’s being released on the band’s own ADTR Records (like 2013ʹs Common Courtesy), this record marks their first distribution deal with Epitaph and is the first time they’ve worked with Grammy winner Andy Wallace (Foo Fighters, Slayer), who was brought in to mix.“

We completely changed the way we wrote, recorded and mixed this album,” says vocalist Jeremy McKinnon. “It was one of the most unique recording experiences we’ve ever had. We rented a cabin in the Colorado mountains and just wrote with the five of us together in a room, which was the polar opposite of the last three albums we’ve made. We just let thingshappen organically and in the moment. I think it forever changed the way we make music. And working with Bill was an awesome experience. He was a bit hard to read at first, so I think we subconsciously pushed ourselves harder to try to impress him. As a result, we gave this album everything we had.”

Recorded at Stevenson’s Fort Collins-based Blasting Room Studios, Bad Vibrations masterfully channels the kinetic energy that recently found A Day To Remember named “The Best Live Band Of 2015′′ by Alternative Press. The band decided to forgo digitally driven production and focus on live recording. “These days it seems like a lot of heavy sounding music is heading more and more in a digital direction,” notes McKinnon. “That’s not necessarily a bad thing, but we wanted to go the opposite way and make something that’s aggressive but has more of a natural flow and feel to it.”

By powering Bad Vibrations with so much raw passion, A Day To Remember ultimately deliver some of their most emotionally intense material todate. “I’m like a child screaming in a room when I write,” laughs McKinnon. “I’m singing about the things that are frustrating me, but at some point there’s an arc within the song. It’s almost like I’m giving advice to another person about whatever I’m struggling with, but I think I’m really just trying to give that advice to myself.”

The catharsis-inducing album sees the band tackling duplicity and deception (on the gloriously frenzied ‘Same About You’), the destructive nature of judgmental behavior (on ‘Justified,’ a track shot through with soaring harmonies and sprawling guitar work), addiction (on the darkly charged ‘Reassemble’), and friendship poisoned by unchecked ego (on ‘Bullfight,’ a track with a classic-punk chorus that brilliantly gives way to a Viking-metal-inspired bridge).‘

Paranoia,’ one of the most urgent tracks on Bad Vibrations, fuses fitful tempos and thrashing riffs in its powerful portrait of mental unraveling—an idea born from the band’s commitment to close collaboration in making the album. “Originally it was a joke song about someone being paranoid, but then Neil and Kevin and I started brainstorming lyrics together, which we’d never done before,” recalls McKinnon. “It ended up being shaped so that the verse is a person talking to apsychiatrist, the pre-chorus is the psychiatrist talking back to that person, and then the chorus is paranoia personified. The whole thing just exploded and came together in this really cool way.”

On ‘Naivety,’ the band slips into a melancholy mood that’s perfectly matched by the song’s bittersweet, pop-perfect melody. Says McKinnon, “It’s about that journey when you’re getting older and starting to view the world as a little less magical than you used to, and you’re missing that youthful enthusiasm from when you were a kid.”

Ultimately, McKinnon says that this particular album-making process breathed new life into the band. “Breaking out of our comfort zone and working in a less controlled way, we ended up making something that feels good to everyone, and we can’t wait to go out and tour on it,” he says. “I think a big part of why our music connects with people is that they’re able to get such an emotional release from our songs. And while most of the songs are me venting about whatever’s affecting me at the time, people who are going through something similar can see that it’s coming from a real, honest place. That’s really the core of what A Day To Remember has always been.”

A Day To Remember’s new album, Bad Vibrations, is available now on ADTR Records.
Papa Roach
Papa Roach
Over the past two decades Papa Roach have established themselves as true trendsetters in rock music: They've been nominated for two Grammys, toured the globe with everyone from Eminem to Marilyn Manson and crafted the nü metal anthem “Last Resort,” which is still in heavy rotation on rock radio seventeen years after its release. However, the group's ninth full-length Crooked Teeth sees the band returning to their humble—and hungry—roots. The album was recorded in a cramped North Hollywood studio with up-and-coming producers Nicholas “RAS” Furlong and Colin Brittain, who grew up listening to Papa Roach and inspired them to revisit some of the traits that personally endeared the band to them, most notably frontman Jacoby Shaddix's remarkable rapping technique. From the instantly infectious nature of the title track to the atmospheric sheen of the ballad “Periscope” (which features Skylar Grey) and the hip-hop rock mashup “Sunrise Trailer Park” (which features an impassioned verse from Machine Gun Kelly), Crooked Teeth displays the various sides of Papa Roach and illustrates why they've managed to remain relevant while musical trends ebb and flow. Crooked Teeth also sees Shaddix pulling no punches lyrically, as evidenced on intensely personal tracks like “Born For Greatness,” produced by Jason Evigan (Jason Derulo, Demi Lovato, Kehlani, Madonna), which sees Shaddix getting sentimental about his three children, or “American Dreams” where the lifelong pacifist begs the listener to ask, “have you ever thought war was a sickness? The album’s acclaimed track “Help” debuted as the #1 Most Added at Active Rock and quickly became the #1 rock song in the country. Crooked Teeth is out May 19 via Eleven Seven Music.
Falling In Reverse
Falling In Reverse
The fine line between genius and insanity, self-seriousness and self-deprecation, implosion and explosion: that is the phantom zone where Falling In Reverse thrives.

Falling In Reverse founder, frontman, and Machiavellian heroic supervillan / villainous superhero Ronnie Radke is the walking, talking, breathing, spitting, screaming, singing, fighting, loving, hyper-confident, sensitive, and vulnerable embodiment of a generation’s id. He’s the ego and super-ego in the classic Freudian sense, “slipping” all over the place with vicious bite and playful innuendo. With his music, art, and life, he is the living embodiment of broken homes, the frustrated contradiction of self-destruction, and everyday single-minded defiance against a world gone mad.

Coming Home is his latest reinvention, coming full-circle back to the start, reinvigorated as mad scientist conductor of soaring, transcendent, engaging alternative pop-rock with massive radio hooks and a still-beating heavy metal hardcore heart. ‘Broken,’ ‘Loser,’ ‘Hanging On,’ ‘I Don’t Mind’ and ‘Coming Home’ are shocking in their epic scope, vibrant authenticity, and unrelenting dedication to personal truth.

He shoved the world of Warped Tour kicking and screaming into the vintage decadence of the hard rock scene with the band he formed with his childhood best friend in Las Vegas. Then, even as countless bands followed in his wake, he was on the stylistic move, dominating the social media conversation and crowd sing-alongs with Falling In Reverse’s debut album, The Drug in Me is You, now based in Southern California.

As Revolver, Kerrang!, Alternative Press, and the rest of the rock and metal press anointed him the scene’s new king on the strength of playful self-examinations-turned-anthems like ‘Raised By Wolves,’ ‘Tragic Magic’ and ‘I’m Not a Vampire,’ Radke and his crew shook up conventions once again, dropping the ironically titled Fashionably Late years before the audience at large had any suspicions about what would hit ‘em.

What began as the “worst music video of all time” (according to media tastemaker VICE) turned into another 20 million YouTube views (for a band closing in on roughly 100 million views total) in ‘Alone.’ Like many parts of the eclectic album, it’s a rap-metal hybrid with a forward thinking step into modern electro beats. Like the best of Radke’s work, the song serves as both hyper masculine anthem and anxiety confessional. The press and fans followed the band’s every move, documenting each twist and turn.

Just Like You mined similar territory with even more precision, from the title track to undeniable metalcore bangers like ‘Chemical Prisoner’ and ‘Guillotine IV (The Final Chapter)’ to the poppy crowd-mover ‘Sexy Drug’ and heartbreaking ballad ‘Brother.’

Coming Home is the most focused Falling In Reverse album, thematically and artistically. Crafted once again with Michael “Elvis” Baskette (Alter Bridge, Slash, Trivium), who has worked on every one of Radke’s records going back to the now-classic debut album from Escape The Fate, the record sees the group at their most atmospheric. It’s the latest bold step for a frontman who has defined himself by a mixture of courage and vulnerability, of bravado and introspection. He’s tightened his personal inner circle and withdrawn from the antics of the past as he’s poured even more of himself into his art.

Coming Home is the album Radke dreamed about making as a kid, teaching himself to play guitar with Blink-182 and Green Day songs, rapping along to Dr. Dre and Eminem, skipping school, going to shows, and doing whatever it took to redefine his life beyond the hardscrabble circumstances of his upbringing, even when the obstacles were of his own design. Now it’s time to get Coming Home to as many people as possible.

Falling In Reverse continues to champion the outsider, the cast aside, the underestimated, making music to empower and inspire life’s underdogs.
The Devil Wears Prada
The Devil Wears Prada
The road, literally and figuratively, brought The Devil Wears Prada to their sixth full-length album Transit Blues [Rise Records].

In many ways, the group—Mike Hranica (vocals), Jeremy DePoyster (rhythm guitar, clean vocals) and Andy Trick (bass), with the recent addition of Kyle Sipress (guitar)—has embraced transition and change since their 2005 formation. After the pivotal breakout With Roots Above and Branches Below in 2009, the boys challenged the status quo and notched widespread critical acclaim, landing two consecutive Top 10 debuts on the Billboard Top 200 for the conceptual Zombie EP [2010] and Dead Throne [2011]. 2013’s 8:18 continued to expand their imprint on heavy music, while the intergalactic concept epic Space EP most recently blasted off to a #18 debut and praise from Alternative Press, Loudwire, and more. Along the way, they’ve treaded countless miles on sold out headline tours, on the Vans Warped Tour multiple times, and in tow with Motörhead, Slayer, and Slipknot. Throughout the past decade-plus, the band charted a course to this juncture.

“Transit Blues is all about growing,” Hranica says of the new material. “We’re constantly in motion on tour. You’re endlessly going from one place to another. Aging physically and mentally is more at the forefront. In the past, anger was a big inspiration. These days, separation and mourning are the more immediate topics. Zeroing in, it’s specifically the separation that comes from traveling.”

As part of the journey, The Devil Wears Prada markedly evolved. Longtime friend Guiseppe Capolupo [Haste The Day] entered the fold on the drums for the recording of Transit Blues. In order to foster creativity and tap into their camaraderie, the guys, along with touring keyboardist and co-writer Jon Gering, holed up in Watertown, WI and Sawyer, MI rental homes and barns during the winter to write Transit Blues together (joined by Hranica’s two puppies, of course). This approach mirrored that of Dead Throne’s initial sessions.
“On the past couple of records, some guys would be at a hotel, and others would stay at home,” he explains. “We realized that process wasn’t really conducive to being creative because everybody’s on a schedule. You have to wake up at a certain time, drive to the rehearsal space, try to write, and then leave for dinner. In Watertown, we were all together. If we felt like it at any moment, we could go in the barn in jam. We could take breaks, crack a beer, or toss the football around, but we were always nearby and naturally writing.”

“We’ve been slowly developing the process we used for this over the last ten years of writing,” says Andy. “We get together and just go for it.”

“Everyone contributes,” adds Jeremy. “We find ways to work together. We began this journey on Space. Each of us is coming up with ideas, writing songs, and bringing them together. It’s really a team effort.”

For recording, the group headed to West Babylon, NY to once again join forces Dan Korneff [Pierce the Veil, Motionless in White]. This marked their second successive collaboration with the producer behind the board.

“We love Dan,” exclaims Mike. “He rolled up and fit in perfectly with us too. Space went just like we wanted it to. It was a no-brainer to get together again. He’s quiet and very methodical. When it’s time to really figure out what we want to do with a song or bypass a roadblock, he’s the guy we want to be with.”

“He gets us, and we get him,” agrees Andy. “It’s relaxed, but when we’re working it gets serious. It was another great experience with Dan.”

The first single “Daughter” paved the path for Transit Blues. Galloping on gnashing guitars, guttural screams, and haunting textures, it packs a contemplative punch inspired by one of Hranica’s favorite novels The Mandarins by Simone de Beauvoir.

“A lot of the lyrics are directly derivative of what’s happening in these few pages of the book’s climax,” he continues. “At one point, the protagonist, based on de Beauvoir, says she never loves her daughter. It’s a shedding of obligation no one would ever see. I loathe obligation personally, and it feels like a parallel to complacency. I love that she boldly makes that proclamation and leaves everything spinning. It’s this weight relinquished.”

“I like for the music to play to what Mike is saying,” Jeremy elaborates. “We got in sync because the music really connects to the words. It’s the best example of that.”

The percussive pummeling of “Praise Poison” cackles with a screeching reference to William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury, while “Lock & Load” takes aim at the world’s gun epidemic through the album’s most menacing, yet gut-wrenchingly restrained moment.

“We wrote it to be unsettling because of the subject matter,” sighs Hranica. “This epidemic is one of the most unsettling things there is. We’re watching innocent people die over and over again. Anger drives that one.”

The airy elegance of “Home for Grave II” rounds out a story the frontman began on 8:18 and in his novella of the same name. Everything culminates on the succinct and sharp thrashing of the title track “Transit Blues” where screams give way to a dark hum, hypnotic chorus, and entrancing keyboard outro.
“It talks at length about the anxiety that sits in the background all day long, but will ramp up at certain times,” Hranica admits. “Anxiety and panic attacks have become such a huge part of my life since 8:18. It’s partially from getting one place to another and feeling stuck or like I don’t have control. The song speaks directly about the disorder. It’s at the forefront and part of what I consider the Transit Blues.”
In the end, Transit Blues propels the next era of The Devil Wears Prada, and it’s their most urgent, unbreakable, and undeniable yet.

“We’re an 11-year-old band, but in many ways it feels brand new,” concludes Jeremy. “This is the first full-length we’ve all done together. Our chemistry is the best it’s ever been. Prada has had new life breathed into it.”

“I feel like immediacy is one of the most important factors in being creative,” he leaves off. “The impact can be so colorful when a song is direct and to the point. That’s what we emphasized this time around. It’s Prada.”
Venue Information:
The Bomb Factory
2713 Canton Street
Dallas, TX, 75226
http://thebombfactory.com