Lord Huron

Lord Huron

Cut Worms

Fri, September 28, 2018

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$35.50

This event is all ages

Lord Huron
Lord Huron
Unburdened by contractual obligations and working at their studio and informal clubhouse Whispering Pines in Los Angeles, Lord Huron found the freedom and comfort to pursue their vision without compromise. The result is Vide Noir: a sonically bold, bravely-executed saga that pushes the band's sound in ambitious new directions.

Singer, songwriter and producer Ben Schneider found inspiration wandering restlessly through his adopted home of Los Angeles at night. His aimless nocturnal journeys ranged all over the city - across the twinkling grid of the valley; into the creeping shadows of the foothills; through downtown's neon canyons; way out to the darksome ocean. The resulting collection of songs feels like an epic odyssey through the city, across dimensions and out into the cosmos.

Many of Vide Noir's songs were tested on the road as early as 2016 and honed with a jeweler's precision into their final form. Dusty ballads share space on the album with punky rippers, '50s sock-hop sways and ethereal electronic passages. Each entry is a glinting star, and together they form a sonic constellation examining the search for meaning amidst the cold indifference of the universe.

Vide Noir was mixed by Dave Fridmann (The Flaming Lips/MGMT) and engineered by Sonny DiPerri (Portugal. The Man, Animal Collective). The album honors the traditions of both rock and folk as it embraces modern studio techniques. The stylistic experimentation speaks to Lord Huron's confidence as storytellers and as craftsmen, armed with a growing array of tools.

Lord Huron's work always comes richly adorned, and Vide Noir is no exception. The album will be accompanied by a wealth of imagery, films and immersive experiences crafted to expand upon its narratives and themes. A true multi-media artist, Schneider has previously used videos, a comic book, a choose-your-own-adventure hotline and assorted Easter eggs as means of deepening the listener experience. Fans steely enough to confront the ineffable have already uncovered a few of these accoutrements.

Lord Huron was created by Los Angeles-based Ben Schneider. Born and raised in Michigan, Schneider drew inspiration from the Great Lakes, which were carved by glaciers 14,000 years ago, and his music stands in awe and wonder of the natural world.

After writing and recording two independent EPs (Into the Sun and Mighty) on his own, demand grew for Lord Huron to perform live. Schneider recruited friends Mark Barry (percussion), Miguel Briseño (bass) and Tom Renaud (guitar). Having first played music together at the tender age of 12, the group reunited and quickly hit their stride, transforming the project into a full-fledged band. Lord Huron signed with IAMSOUND, and the label released 2012's Lonesome Dreams, and Strange Trails in 2015.

Strange Trails included the song, "The Night We Met," which was featured in the Netflix original series "13 Reasons Why." The series and song both became hits, and "The Night We Met" was certified platinum in January of 2018. This year also marks the beginning of a unique alliance between Whispering Pines and Republic Records, who will partner in the release of Vide Noir.

Lord Huron has toured extensively in North America and Europe, earning rave reviews and performing for sold-out crowds at some of the world's most prestigious venues. The band has appeared at a wide range of music festivals including Lollapalooza, Coachella, Bonnaroo and Newport Folk Festival.
Cut Worms
Cut Worms
“The cut worm forgives the plough.”

– William Blake, Proverbs of Hell



Cut Worms is the nom de plume of Max Clarke, assumed while studying illustration at Chicago's Columbia College.



Despite a .300 batting average and a 63 mph curveball from the mound, Cut Worms' Max Clarke was the black sheep of his baseball-centric, Midwestern family. He was drawn to the creative shadows, drawn to the basement 4-track and late nights in the art studio as much as he was the dugout. He had a born knack for conjuring warm sounds and fine images. His songs in particular crackle with the heat of a love-struck nostalgia: golden threads of storytelling, like visceral memories, woven together with a palpable Everly Brothers' influence and 50s/60s naiveté. But the kid still has a pretty mean curve. Like one of his creative pillars David Lynch, Clarke's songs and artwork are also curveballs with a curious underbelly.

A Cut Worms song may impress an innocent summer stroll across fields of tall grass and lavender — but there's undoubtedly a severed ear out in there in the grass. Some unseen dark forces are always lurking at the edges of songs' sunbursts. Bright, beautiful lap steel or a cheery harmonica accompaniment often belie an impending doom or crestfallen narrator.

Clarke didn't necessarily seek out a life as fulltime musician. Before releasing music under the moniker of Cut Worms, Clarke went to school for illustration with the idea of a sensible career in graphic design, then took on a string of handy-man type odd jobs. Still, songwriting - that semi-secret practice Clarke had been cultivating since the age of 12 - kept gnawing at him. It was the only sort of work that didn't feel like work. Plus, if there's ever a time to do something as unreliable, unrealistic, and imprudent as throwing yourself wholly into music, might as well be done when you're in your twenties.

A number of songs that make up his LP, Hollow Ground, bloomed from his time in Chicago during period of driven creativity. In particular, "Like Going Down Sideways" and "Don't Want To Say Good-Bye" find new life on Hollow Ground, polished from their initial appearances on Cut Worms' 2017 introductory Alien Sunset EP. Both still fizzle with a lo-fi 60s sound, but cleaned up, they gleam.

The remainder of Hollow Ground was written in Clarke's current home in Brooklyn, where he still home-demos songs. The record was recorded partially in Los Angeles at the home studio of Foxygen's Jonathan Rado, and partially in New York with Jason Finkel at Gary's Electric. Clarke, who plays keyboards, bass, and lap steel in addition to his main guitar, handled most of the instrumentation across the set. He explains he's always strove toward a specific musical aesthetic, and Hollow Ground marks the closest he's gotten to hitting it thus far.

Hollow Ground is imbued with a sharp, self-aware lyricism; as strong as the music is here, Clarke shows an affinity for evocative storytelling, striking the balance between cerebral and simplicity. Look no further than the chiming, rollicking standout "Cash For Gold." For a song with so much sock hop energy, it's actually about being trapped in one's introvert head — stuck on the couch or against the wall at the edges of the dance floor.

Sometimes, on Hollow Ground, we find characters impossibly lustful, sometimes brooding, while in other parts they fumble along, hopeful and painfully self-aware. If the music can be said to have any sort of through-line, it revolves around Clarke's obvious delight in singing his heart out through varying degrees of agony. His songwriting both evokes and explores the raw realm of youth, its weightlessness and possibilities, but channels it through the lens of someone more restrained, who's been through it all before. Someone who's old enough to know better but still gets drawn back in to the romanticism of teenage feelings - and knows how to take the listener along, too.
Venue Information:
The Bomb Factory
2713 Canton Street
Dallas, TX, 75226
http://thebombfactory.com